Weekly Round-Up: September 18-24

UPCOMING EVENTS

Monday, September 18
Volunteer Opportunity: Pets & Crafts, 11:30 a.m. – 12:30 p.m., Red Barn

  • Join the Animal Welfare Committee in making toys for shelter dogs and cats! Free Insomnia cookies will be provided.

Flu Shots Clinic (FREE!), 11:30 a.m – 1:30 p.m., Brandeis School of Law (2219 S. 3rd Street), Washer Lounge

  • Bring your UofL ID and printed consent form for a free flu shot.

Graduate Student Writing Group Meeting, 6:00 – 8:00 p.m., Ekstrom Library, University Writing Center (First Floor)

Tuesday, September 19
Open Conversation on Graduate Student Sustainability, Inclusivity, Equity Meeting, 12:15 – 2:00 p.m., Ekstrom Library, 117A

  • Join conversations between graduate students and faculty toward creating more sustainable, equitable, and inclusive structures for all graduate students in the English department.

Wednesday, September 20
Campus Talk: The Ugly Side of Women in Media, 12:00 – 1:30 p.m., Cultural Center (120 E. Brandeis Ave), Multipurpose Room

Creative Writing Group Meeting, 5:00 – 7:00 p.m., Ekstrom Library, University Writing Center (First Floor)

Thursday, September 21
PLAN Workshop: Workshopping the CV, 2:00 – 4:00 p.m., Houchens Building, Room 105

Teach English in Japan Info Session, 4:30 – 5:30 p.m., Student Activities Center (SAC), 303A

Saturday, September 23
Volunteer Opportunity: Animal House, 3:30 – 5:30 p.m., Animal House (3516 Newburg Rd)

  • Join the Animal Welfare Committee in volunteering at the Animal House shelter. Contact Minoru Chou for more information: (502) 939-5685.

Friday, September 29
Discourse & Semiotics Workshop, 12:30 – 2:00 p.m., Stevenson 407

  • We will be discussing Steven Skaggs’ (UofL Fine Arts Dept.) recently published book, FireSigns: A Semiotic Theory for Graphic Design (MIT Press), and how semiotics can can aid in the critique of art and design. For more information, visit the website.

Thursday, October 5
Engaging Diverse Voices in Writing & Reading Roundtable Discussion
, 4:00 – 5:30 p.m., Ekstrom Library, University Writing Center (First Floor)

  • View the flyer for more information.

Check out the Writing Center Events Calendar for upcoming writing events.

Check out the PLAN Workshop series through the School of Interdisciplinary and Graduate Studies for professional development workshop opportunities.

Check out the UofL Events Calendar for upcoming events in the UofL community.

APPLICATIONS

Deadline September 29, 4:00 p.m: Graduate Student Research Fund Application

  • The Graduate Network in Arts and Sciences (GNAS), a representative body of graduate students from the many disciplines in the College of Arts & Sciences, is offering research funding for A&S graduate students. GNAS will award grants up to $250 to help A&S graduate students offset the costs of conducting research, participating in conferences, and purchasing materials needed for research. For more information on how to apply, visit the website or view the application form.

CALLS FOR PAPERS

Deadline October 15 at midnight (CDT) – 2018 Multidisciplinary Graduate Student Conference

  • We invite abstracts for 20-minute papers from master’s or PhD students from any discipline on any medieval, Renaissance, or early modern topic in Europe, the Americas, or the Mediterranean world. The 2018 conference schedule will include workshops and presentations with rare books in addition to traditional conference sessions. Submit a proposal using this online form. A printable CFP is available online here. Contact Professor and Vice Chair of the UofL English Department Andrew Rabin for funding opportunities related to this conference: rabin@louisville.edu.
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Weekly Roundup: September 11-17

UPCOMING EVENTS

Monday September 11th – Traces in the Stacks – Searching for 19th Century Marginalia – 11-12:30pm Ekstrom 117A 

 http://events.louisville.edu/event/traces_in_the_stacks#.WbLRW2uPKUk

 

Monday September 11th – Garden of Verses: Poems, Flowers, and Nineteenth-Century Readers –3:30-4:30pm Humanities 300

http://events.louisville.edu/event/andrew_stauffer_garden_of_verses_poems_flowers_and_nineteenth-century_readers#.WbLR72uPKUk

 

Monday September 11th – Graduate Student Writing Group – 6:00-8:00pm University Writing Center 102 http://events.louisville.edu/event/graduate_student_writing_group_4055#.WbLSzWuPKUk

 

Sunday, September 17th – University Symphony Orchestra (Free!) – 7:30pm School of Music Comstock Hall

http://events.louisville.edu/event/university_symphony_orchestra#.WbLZPWuPKUk

 

Check out the Writing Center events calendar for upcoming writing events.
Check out the PLAN Workshops series through the School of Interdisciplinary and Graduate Studies for professional development workshop opportunities.

 

CALLS FOR PAPERS

Conference Abstract Due September 30, 2017 – 2018 American Society for the History of Rhetoric Conference taking place in May in Minnesota. http://ashr.org/gatherings/symposia/upcoming-symposium/

Conference Abstract Due October 15, 2017 – Call for Responses: Making Future Matters for 2018 Watson Conference. Those who attended the 2017 Thomas R. Watson Preconference Symposium are invited to submit a response to symposium keynote webtexts. 300-500 word abstracts (including media needs) are due no later than October 15. Since we hope to publish with Computer and Composition Digital Press, we also encourage media-rich essays of approximately 2,000 words that address issues in two or more keynote webtexts. Please email maryp.sheridan@louisville.edu and rlwysockijr@gmail.com for more information and draft due dates.

Conference Abstract Due October 15, 2017 2018 Multidisciplinary Graduate Student Conference taking place in January in Chicago. We invite abstracts for 20-minute papers from master’s or PhD students from any discipline on any medieval, Renaissance, or early modern topic in Europe, the Americas, or the Mediterranean world. https://www.newberry.org/sites/default/files/calendar-attachments/2018GradConCFP_0.pdf

Journal  Submission due December 15, 2017Currents in Teaching and Learning, a peer-reviewed electronic journal that fosters exchanges among reflective teacher-scholars across disciplines. Spring 2018 issue. http://www.worcester.edu/currents/

 

SELF CARE ON CAMPUS

Free Flu Shots

http://louisville.edu/campushealth/services/flu-care-shots/flu-shot-schedule

30 Minute Chair Massages for $8

http://louisville.edu/healthpromotion/services/massage

 

What I’m Working On by Kelly Carty

This time last year, I was managing the kitchen at a cooperative center in rural Michigan. Most of my days were spent writing recipes, cooking, doing dishes, planning to feed 100+ people during summer camp, and talking to people about the link between food and social justice. I knew I would be starting grad school at UofL in August, but it felt so far away.

A lot has happened since last April. I’ve made new friends. I’ve learned a few things about Shakespeare. I’ve helped UofL students with writing. I’ve been able to add tons of books to my goodreads account.

So what am I working on now, as a second semester English MA student?

Seminar Papers

I have two end-of-term papers to finish before the end of the month.

One, which is for Dr. Anderson’s course on African American Literature and Environmental Roots, explores Baudrillard’s concepts of simulacra and the hyperreal in Octavia E. Butler’s Parable of the Sower. I might link this to Barthes description of mythology (because I ❤ theory) or (but probably “and”) double-voiced texts. I’m still sorting this one out and doing research to figure out what’s at stake for my argument.

My other paper is for my exotic non-English department class, Philosophy of Science, which is taught by Dr. Guy Dove. For that paper, I am evaluating Philip Kitcher’s essay on scientific reductionism (well, specifically biological antireductionism) by applying it to the move from classical genetics (i.e. Gregor Mendel’s pea plant experiments) to molecular genetics (i.e. most of the stuff done after Watson, Crick, Wilkins, and Franklin determined the structure of DNA).

Prepping for a Theory Exam

Dr. Kopelson’s theory class has a final exam in a few weeks (eek) so I am semi-planning for it. Mostly, this means maintaining a Google doc with brief summaries, significant excerpts, and keywords for each theorist. It also means helping plan a pre-exam study session with my theory classmates and making sure someone brings wine.  

Writing Center Tutoring

Although you may think I should have figured out how Writing Center tutoring works by now, I haven’t. I still think about ways I can become a more effective and compassionate tutor. For the most part, this “thinking” consists of me dumping my Writing Center-related ideas or problems on Cassie or Bronwyn.  In addition to these tutor-centered thoughts, I also think about ways I can help maintain the friendly, supportive environment we have in the Writing Center. My coworkers are great, so this is pretty easy. We do organize events (mostly potlucks) and pranks (e.g. wearing the same color each day of the week when Bronwyn returned from quick trip) from time to time.

Second Year/ Post-MA Planning

Because I’m nearing the end of the first year of my MA, I’m starting to mull over thesis and CP ideas. I came into the program broadly interested in the intersection of science Carty.0324171407aand literature, but I’ve recently been swept away by literary theory (thanks to Professor Kopelson and my theory classmates). Right now, I am trying to figure out a way to link all three.

I am also vaguely working out a plan for what to do after I finish this MA program. Perhaps I will continue onto a PhD program (but in what? And where?).  

Life

This is an on-going project …

Kelly Carty is a first-year M.A. student.

Weekly Roundup: April 16 – 22

ANNOUNCEMENTS 

Digital Media Research

Rick Wysocki is the digital media research assistant this year. He will have open hours in the Mac Lab (HUM 204) all semester to help Faculty, Graduate Students, and students with multimodal and digital projects. His hours are Mondays from 1-2 p.m. and Fridays from 203 p.m. From Rick: “I’m happy to help people across the university with their digital/multimodal projects. It is also a good thing for teachers to let their students know about if they need access to a computer or specifically to a Mac.”

UPCOMING EVENTS 

GSAW 2017

Check out the Writing Center events calendar for upcoming writing events.

Check out the PLAN Workshop series through the School of Interdisciplinary and Graduate Studies for professional development workshop opportunities.

CALLS FOR PAPERS

CFP Database

FEATURED BLOG POSTS

What I Learned in Year One by Travis Rountree 

What I Learned in Year One by Travis Rountree

Wow, so many first things I wish I knew in my first year and have learned since then.

Personal or Drama Central:

Without the support of my friends and family throughout that first year I can confidently say there is no way I would have made it.  Quite honestly, it was one of the hardest years of my life (sounds hyperbolic, but truly it was).  I moved from a mountain town that I grew to love dearly over the course of 9 years to Louisville, hours away from family and friends. Then I went through a terrible break up towards the end of my first semester. Luckily, I had friends I could depend on. I think that’s the first thing I would say when you come to PhD land.  Learn to lean on others. After the break up happened, I was in shambles and still had two weeks left of the semester. While my professors were so understanding (which was wonderful), I depended on my cohort like no other and they were there for me. From checking in over the phone daily, watching movies, or kidnapping me to get me out of my house, everyone in my cohort (and others!) helped me to make it through to the other side. Each person here was amazing and I truly appreciated it (really, thanks y’all). I also depended greatly on my family. If you have that support use it! They were tremendously supportive during that time in my first year and encouraged me to keep going all the way through this long dissertation process.

From that first year, I learned so much about who I was and how to live with and by myself (alongside my two kitties of course). One of the most significant parts of the first year was coping with change. I would highly recommend the counseling center too. It has helped me tremendously to understand who I am and to grow into a someone who now has a loving relationship. Am I oversharing? #sorrynotsorry

Professional…whatever that is:

Similar to Ashley’s earlier posting, I came into the program realizing that I didn’t know everything that my peers did.  I knew a lot from being a Writing Across the Curriculum consultant and being an assistant director of Comp., but still had lots of educational gaps to fill.  I had to be patient with myself as I adjusted to learning more. I also tailored much of what I learned to my own interests. First-year Travis did a great job of setting up Fourth-year Travis’s dissertation (Travis thinks it’s weird to talk in the third voice). From talking to my diss. director in his office about my topic to writing conference presentations that I used as the impetus for my dissertation chapters, I always tried to keep focus on what I could possibly use for the diss.

Like Rachel’s earlier post, I also had to learn that NO was not a bad word.  I’m such an extroverted person that I want to do all the things for everyone.  As I’ve moved further into the program, I’ve learn that it’s ok to say NO and use that time for self-care instead of work.

So…

After separating these things, it’s strange because the personal is professional and the professional is personal.  From Year One I’ve noticed that there is often a blurring of lines between those two. Some of the best mentors and professional friends have become the closest people in my life.  Another example of this is how I’ve recently become Facebook friends with most of the folks at my new university (including my department chair!).  I’ve come to realize that I won’t apologize for who I am (hell, at 35 I’m way past that).  I’m going to post pictures of drag shows alongside pictures of me presenting at Cs on the Facebook.  Speaking of, I have officially come out to my classes as queer (something I NEVER would have thought to do in year one) and am now publishing as a queer scholar alongside my Appalachian Rhetoric work.  Ah, so much growth and the merging of professional and personal. Huzzah!

What Travels Well…

Well, since this is one of the last “Year One” postings for this year I want to leave y’all with an excerpt from Jim Wayne Miller’s “The Brier Sermon.” I think it really represents my journey through graduate school from moving into an empty house to thinking about packing up and starting another “year one” at another place that I’ll call home:

Say you were going on a trip

Knowing that you wouldn’t ever be coming back

And all you’d ever have of that place you know,

That place where you’d always lived

Was what you could take with you.

You’d want to think what to take along

What would travel well

What you’d really need and wouldn’t need.

I’m telling you, every day you’re leaving

A place you won’t be coming back to ever.

What are you going to leave behind?

What are you taking with you?

Don’t run off and leave the best part of yourself.

POSSUM

Travis A. Rountree is a doctoral candidate in the final stages of preparing his dissertation for defense. He’s sad to leave Louisville, but is excited about the opportunities that lie ahead.

Weekly Roundup: April 9 – 15

ANNOUNCEMENTS 

 

Digital Media Research

Rick Wysocki is the digital media research assistant this year. He will have open hours in the Mac Lab (HUM 204) all semester to help Faculty, Graduate Students, and students with multimodal and digital projects. His hours are Mondays from 1-2 p.m. and Fridays from 203 p.m. From Rick: “I’m happy to help people across the university with their digital/multimodal projects. It is also a good thing for teachers to let their students know about if they need access to a computer or specifically to a Mac.”

UPCOMING EVENTS 

SAVE THE DATE – EGO Book Sale

  • Monday through Thursday (April 10-13)
  • 7 a.m. to 4 p.m. on each day
  • Bingham Humanities Foyer
  • Sign up here to volunteer and get free books with your wonderful labor: Sign-Up Sheet

Discourse and Semiotics Workshop: Lisa Björkman of Urban and Public Affairs Leads discussion of The Ethical Life by anthropologist Webb Keane

  • Friday, April 14 from 12:00-1:30 p.m.
  • Ekstrom Library W210

Check out the Writing Center events calendar for upcoming writing events.

Check out the PLAN Workshop series through the School of Interdisciplinary and Graduate Studies for professional development workshop opportunities.

CALLS FOR PAPERS

CFP Database

Weekly Roundup: April 2 – 8

ANNOUNCEMENTS 

Survey for the Future of EGO

Your EGO board members have been discussing the future of EGO, because we feel like this is a moment when “what EGO is/does” might change to better serve you. We appreciate your time in taking this brief survey that will hopefully tell us what you think your English Graduate Organization is doing well and what we could be doing better. We want to know how to encourage your active participation and how to get good work done on behalf of all English graduate students at UofL.

This survey is 5 questions, and your responses are both appreciated and anonymous.

Undergraduate Research Participants Needed

Hello EGO! I’m reaching out to see if any instructors are able to help me recruit undergraduate research participants from your courses. My IRB reviewed (17.0045) research project is a user experience/usability study of the Virtual Writing Center. You can help by allowing me to visit your class(es) for 5 minutes to explain the project, or you can forward recruitment information to your classes. This is a paid study; participants will be paid $25 for three hours of time (two 1.5 hours sessions). Please contact me at cabook01@louisville.edu. Thank you! -Cassie Book, Associate Director, University Writing Center

Digital Media Research

Rick Wysocki is the digital media research assistant this year. He will have open hours in the Mac Lab (HUM 204) all semester to help Faculty, Graduate Students, and students with multimodal and digital projects. His hours are Mondays from 1-2 p.m. and Fridays from 203 p.m. From Rick: “I’m happy to help people across the university with their digital/multimodal projects. It is also a good thing for teachers to let their students know about if they need access to a computer or specifically to a Mac.”

UPCOMING EVENTS 

Celebration of Student Writing

  • Wednesday, April 5th: 10:00 – 2:00
  • Lobby of Ekstrom Library
  • The Celebration of Student Writing is an annual event hosted by the Composition Program, the Writing Center, the Digital Media Suite, and University Libraries. It showcases undergraduate student writing (completed or in-progress) to the university community in a variety of ways.

SIGS’ Women Faculty of Color Panel

  • Friday, April 7th, 2:00 – 4:00 p.m.
  • Shumaker Research Building Rm. 139
  • UofL has been able to sponsor several graduate students and faculty to attend the Women Faculty of Color conference at Virginia Tech. The conference aims to help current faculty and emerging scholars of color “gain lessons, ideas, tools, and strategies to bring back to their institutions, organizations, and communities; make new contacts and build lasting relationships; [and become more] inspired, motivated, energized, and empowered.” The women who have been sponsored to attend the conference (three from the English department!) will serve as panelists for our annual Women’s Panel. The panelists will share some of the tools and strategies they learn at the conference and share their own stories, including their struggles and successes, as women faculty of color. Graduate students, faculty, and staff interested in attending can register and find more information on the PLAN website or contact Keri Mathis at kemath01@louisville.edu for more information.

SAVE THE DATE – EGO Book Sale

  • Monday through Thursday (April 10-13)
  • 7 a.m. to 4 p.m. on each day
  • Bingham Humanities Foyer
  • Sign up here to volunteer and get free books with your wonderful labor: Sign-Up Sheet

Discourse and Semiotics Workshop: Lisa Björkman of Urban and Public Affairs Leads discussion of The Ethical Life by anthropologist Webb Keane

  • Friday, April 14 from 12:00-1:30 p.m.
  • Ekstrom Library W210

Check out the Writing Center events calendar for upcoming writing events.

Check out the PLAN Workshop series through the School of Interdisciplinary and Graduate Studies for professional development workshop opportunities.

CALLS FOR PAPERS

CFP Database

HIGHLIGHTED BLOG POSTS

What I Learned in Year One by Ashley Ludwig

What I Wish I’d Known in Graduate School by Dr. David Anderson